greeklesbian

xaannaax:

bookiesbooty:

It’s back.

This is my favorite video of all time

cunttcobainn

why is it that we’re always told not to get tattoos at a young age because we “will regret it later on” when we are basically told to choose a career path by age 18? i’d rather be 40 years old with a tattoo that meant something to me when i was young than be 40 years old not wanting to get out of bed to go to a job that i hate because i was forced to decide on a career in my teens

musicand-youtube

startorrent02:

ego-x:

darklynoon:

naturepunk:

My blood is literally on fire right now. I cannot believe this.

"yeah, we’re walking right into their homes and shooting them"

jesus fucking christ.

I am speechless.

WATCH THIS. WATCH THIS FOR REAL.

moogle97

sherlockedcumberbabe:

kaehzar:

every time my parents tell me something that I should’ve done that is not helpful to the conversation I’m going to reply with some historical event that shouldn’t have happened like

"You should’ve gotten up earlier"

"Hitler shouldn’t invaded Czechoslovakia"

"You should’ve gotten higher grades then"

"Abraham Lincoln should’ve hired a better bodyguard then"

I witnessed this live, I feel special

koryos
koryos:

tailovecna:

dogitmayconcern:

dogofmylife:

koryos:

Canid Scent-Marking (or, Why Dogs Pee on Things)
I took a lot of pictures of dogs peeing on things for this article.
If you own a dog, have walked a dog, or just have seen a dog on TV, you have probably seen a dog peeing. Particularly that stereotyped male raised-leg posture that Luke is demonstrating above. (In this case, stereotyped refers to a fixed and repetitive set of movements, not a form of doggie-profiling.)
Dogs have a better sense of smell than we do. Heck, most mammals do; we just happen to be in a group- the simians- that ended up using vision a lot more than scent. At some point we more or less lost a means of communication that is absolutely fundamental to the lives of our hairy, warm-blooded cousins.
I’ve talked a bit before about how basic biological behaviors- such as sex or grooming or eating- can be co-opted by evolution to have a social meaning. For canids, urination has become a huge part of how they exchange information with one another.
We have a hard time studying this behavior because of our own limited sense of smell, and I think we are only beginning to grasp just how complex this scent-based communication can be.
I am about to tell you more than you ever wanted to know about dog pee.
Read more…



Interestingly enough, marking frequency and behavior actually is related to a dog’s social standing, at least according to one study.  The study found that dogs who had higher tail carriage (an indication of higher social status) mark more frequently than dogs of low social standing and engaging in overmarking much more frequently. The study also found that sex and intact status had no effect on the frequency of marking and counter marking however intact males were more likely to overmark intact females and that dogs only adjacent-mark on the urine of unfamiliar dogs.

Interesting you should bring up that study: it’s a prime example of what I like to call taking dominance out of context (yes, even scientists do it!) Tail base position can be used as an indicator of social status when observed within a group of animals that are familiar with one another. However, it doesn’t imply “dominance” when a dog has its tail raised up high just walking around with its owner. (Recall: dominance describes a relationship, not a character trait.)
Confidence is probably a better descriptor than “social standing” in this study’s case. It makes sense that less confident dogs are less likely to scent-mark than confident ones, just like less confident dogs are less likely to allow other dogs to smell their anogenital area.
(Also, any paper that only cites sources pre-1999 including Schenkel’s paper is not one you want to take seriously when it talks about dominance.)

koryos:

tailovecna:

dogitmayconcern:

dogofmylife:

koryos:

Canid Scent-Marking (or, Why Dogs Pee on Things)

I took a lot of pictures of dogs peeing on things for this article.

If you own a dog, have walked a dog, or just have seen a dog on TV, you have probably seen a dog peeing. Particularly that stereotyped male raised-leg posture that Luke is demonstrating above. (In this case, stereotyped refers to a fixed and repetitive set of movements, not a form of doggie-profiling.)

Dogs have a better sense of smell than we do. Heck, most mammals do; we just happen to be in a group- the simians- that ended up using vision a lot more than scent. At some point we more or less lost a means of communication that is absolutely fundamental to the lives of our hairy, warm-blooded cousins.

I’ve talked a bit before about how basic biological behaviors- such as sex or grooming or eating- can be co-opted by evolution to have a social meaning. For canids, urination has become a huge part of how they exchange information with one another.

We have a hard time studying this behavior because of our own limited sense of smell, and I think we are only beginning to grasp just how complex this scent-based communication can be.

I am about to tell you more than you ever wanted to know about dog pee.

Read more…

Interestingly enough, marking frequency and behavior actually is related to a dog’s social standing, at least according to one study.  The study found that dogs who had higher tail carriage (an indication of higher social status) mark more frequently than dogs of low social standing and engaging in overmarking much more frequently. The study also found that sex and intact status had no effect on the frequency of marking and counter marking however intact males were more likely to overmark intact females and that dogs only adjacent-mark on the urine of unfamiliar dogs.

Interesting you should bring up that study: it’s a prime example of what I like to call taking dominance out of context (yes, even scientists do it!) Tail base position can be used as an indicator of social status when observed within a group of animals that are familiar with one another. However, it doesn’t imply “dominance” when a dog has its tail raised up high just walking around with its owner. (Recall: dominance describes a relationship, not a character trait.)

Confidence is probably a better descriptor than “social standing” in this study’s case. It makes sense that less confident dogs are less likely to scent-mark than confident ones, just like less confident dogs are less likely to allow other dogs to smell their anogenital area.

(Also, any paper that only cites sources pre-1999 including Schenkel’s paper is not one you want to take seriously when it talks about dominance.)

willow-ridgewell

dry-cereal:

dry-cereal:

dry-cereal:

once i was sick so i got a prescription for codeine cough syrup and when i went to pick it up the pharmacist was like “you really won’t need all of this” and i was like “it’s ok i could just sell it at school” and he was like “YEAAAAAAAH FUTURE PHARMACIST” and fist bumped me

ok apparently this pharmacist is my brother’s old pot dealer

his name is scooter